Amethyst: Its Properties, Lore, and Uses

Amethyst is one of almost everyone's favorite crystals - and how can you blame them?? The gorgeous, deep purple hues can draw you in instantly - and keep you wanting more! But amethyst is more than just a pretty stone. It has a rich history, is loved in jewelry, and is a must-have in the crystal-loving community. Let's take a look at some of the reasons why!

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What is amethyst?

Amethyst is a variety of quartz that is purple in color. It can range from a very light, almost clear color to deep, dark purple that looks like grape jelly. In fact, there is actually a beautiful variety of amethyst from Uruguay that is called "grape jelly amethyst" for just that reason. Even though amethyst is a variety of quartz, it is so well-known that it almost considered to be in its own category. Amethyst is generally abundant in the market, so you can find nice chunks, clusters, geodes, points, and tumbled pieces for a reasonable price. Of course, as with many stones, there is a range of grades (levels of quality) of amethyst - and prices vary accordingly.

An amethyst cluster

Since amethyst is a variety of quartz, it is a silicon dioxide (SiO2). However, we know that, since it's not colorless like quartz, it has additional minerals in it, as well, including iron and manganese. Irradiation - or small amounts of radiation that naturally occur within the Earth - also influences the color of amethyst. This kind of natural "cooking" is nothing to worry about with your crystals! Mama Earth knows what she's doing ;) Amethyst can be found around the globe. I've already mentioned that beautiful, dark pieces are found in Uruguay; but gorgeous amethyst is often found in Brazil, as well as Turkey, Morocco, Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. (as well as in many other countries).

The lore of amethyst

According to the Gemological Institute of America,

"Because of its wine-like color, early Greek legends associated amethyst with Bacchus, the god of wine. Other legends reflected beliefs that amethyst kept its wearer clear-headed and quick-witted in battle and in business affairs. Because amethyst was associated with wine, it was believed that wearing amethyst prevented drunkeness.

Fine amethysts have been set in religious jewelry and royal crown jewels for ages. It was once considered equal in value to ruby, emerald, and sapphire. It’s no wonder that fine amethyst adorns the fingers of bishops as well as the coronation regalia of British royalty."

Additionally, it has been said to have been used by the ancient Egyptians.

Closeup of an amethyst geode

Properties of amethyst

Most notably, amethyst is known the birthstone for February. Amethyst is also related to the astrological signs of Pisces, Virgo, Aquarius, and Capricorn (Melody, Love is in the Earth). It is a stone associated with the crown chakra, which is located at the top of the head. As such, it is said to be a connection to spirituality and the divine, as well as helping to increase intuition. Amethyst is said to be a stone that is good for everyone - a crystal "jack of all trades," in a way. It is said to be good for balancing the left and right hemispheres of the brain, to help one be balanced on all levels. It can also help with insomnia and bad dreams (Ken Harsh, Karma Crystal Guide to Stones). According to Philip Permutt's The Crystal Healer, amethyst also helps with "negotiation skills, decision-making, wealth, business success, moving forward in life, coping with responsibility and change, and public speaking."

Tumbled amethyst stones

Tumbled amethyst stones[/caption] As you can see, there are a lot of reasons to love amethyst - if you need a reason! Its gorgeous purple hue and beautiful points may win you over all by themselves. Have you used amethyst before? Share a pic of your amethyst to Instagram, tag us (@mooncatcrytals), and include the hashtag #mycrystalpix so we can share our favorites!! Also, be sure to click here to check out our current selection of amethyst!

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The gorgeous, deep purple hues can draw you in instantly - and keep you wanting more! But amethyst is more than just a pretty stone. It has a rich history, is loved in jewelry, and is a must-have in the crystal-loving community.

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